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Minutes of the meeting of the presidium of the International Committee of Slavicists

(Zagreb, October 16--18, 2000)

The meeting of the Presidium of the International Committee of Slavicists took place in Zagreb, October 16- -18, 2000. In keeping with the decision made at the consultative meeting in Brno and Prague (1999), viz. that the 2000 meeting be attended by representatives from six Slavic countries (East Slavic: Belorussia, the Russian Federation; West Slavic: the Czech Republic, Poland; South Slavic: Croatia, Slovenia) and six non- Slavic countries (European: Austria, Italy, Germany, Romania; non European: Canada, the United States of America), the meeting was attended by 15 members of the International Committee of Slavicists, three of whom were from Slovenia as organizer of the impending congress: Prof. HenadŸ Cychun, Prof. Michael Flier, Prof. Ivo Frangeš (honorary member), Prof. Doron Gamulescu, Prof. Stefano Garzonio, Prof. Karl Gutschmidt, Prof. Miha Javornik (Secretary), Prof. Anica Nazor, Prof. Gerhard Neweklowsky, Prof. Ivo Pospíšil, Prof. Aleksander Skaza (Vice-President), Prof. Lucjan Suchanek, Prof. Alenka (c)ivic-Dular (President); alenka.dular@guest.arnes.si, Prof. Oleg N. Trubačev and Prof. Nicholas G. Zegulin. The meeting was also attended by Prof. Cvjetko Milanja (President of the Croatian Committee of Slavicists), Prof. Borislav Pavlovski (President of the Croatian Philological Society), Prof. Dubravka Sesar (former President of the Croatian Committee of Slavicists) and Mr. Miloš Zelenka, assistant professor (Editor of the Journal Slavia).

The sessions took place at Dubrovnik Hotel in Zagreb on October 16-17, 2000; on October 18 the participants went on a sightseeing tour to the Plitvice Lakes Nature Reserve.

The introductory speakers were Borislav Pavlovski on behalf of the Croatian Philological Society and Cvjetko Milanja behalf of the Croatioan Committee of Slavicists. The former's address of welcome included a brief presentation of the activities of the Croatian Philological Society; the latter informed the attending members about, and invited them to participate in, the International Croatian Congress of Slavicists held every four years since 1995: the first was in Pula (1995), the second in Osijek (1999), the third will be put forward to the year 2002 in order to avoid collision with the 13th International Congress of Slavicists in Ljubljana 2003. -- The two speeches were followed by Prof. Ivo Pranjković's talk on the current state of the standard Croatian language and its use in Croatia; a short discussion ensued.

Occasioned by the meeting, and opened on the day that the meeting was convened, was an exhibition of Croat publications in Slavic studies; the publications were available to the attendants of the meeting.

The agenda of the Zagreb meeting consisted of issues vital to the organization of the 13th International Congress of Slavicists (Ljubljana 2003):

  1. The themes for the 13th International Congress of Slavicists and their approval.
  2. The forms of work at the 13th International Congress of Slavicists.
  3. New business.
The report on the progress of the preparations for the 13th International Congress of Slavicists pointed out that the 1998--2000 period was marked by activities relating to the aspects of content/program, finance, organizational details and promotion. The Congress will take palce from August 15 through August 21, 2003 in Ljubljana on the premises of the Ivan Cankar Congress Center; the term may not be the most suitable, but even as early as 1998 this was the only temporal slot still available in the program schedule of the Ivan Cankar Congress Center. In the absence of feasible alternatives the Presidium of the International Congress of Slavicists approved the term. -- The Congress logo is beeing designated; the Post of Slovenia has been requested to consider honoring the 13th Congress by issuing a stamp commemorating Franz Miklosich.

Member counties' response to the minutes of the 1999 Brno-Prague meeting: 21 out of the 39 contries which are members of the International Association of Slavicists responded in one way or another to the preliminary list of the 2003 congress themes or to other items contained in the minutes of the meeting held in Brno and Prague in 1999. Establishing contact also with the rest of the member countries obviously remains one of the priorities during the coming year.

Etymological Committee founded: The national committees of Slavicists that did respond seconded both the motion that an etymological committee be set up with the International Committee of Slavicists and the motion that Prof. źanna Varbot (Moscow) be nominated chairwoman of this committee. Meanwhile, however, she withdrew her candidacy for the office of chairperson due to objective circumstances, so the office was taken over by Prof. Eva Havlová (Brno), who promptly took steps toward constituting the committee. By mid-October 2000, membership confirmations had arrived from 27 etymologists from 11 countries (Austria, Belorussia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Yugoslavia); additional acceptance is expected from the proposed members from Canada, Croatia, Macedonia and Ukraine.

National quotas: The national quotas for the 13th International Congress of Slavicists had been assigned on the basis of the quotas proposed for teh 12th International Congress of Slavicists (Kraków 1998) -- i.e. a total of 650 participants -- and published in Slavia 69/1, p. 129. In the meantime five national committees (the Belorussian, Finnish, Italian, Macedonian and Yugoslav) asked for their quotas to be expanded. The Presidium of the International Committee of Slavicists granted their requests, so that the final quotas for the national committees are: Slavic countries: Belorussia -- 25, Bosnia and Herzegovina -- 5, Bulgaria --40, Croatia --20, the Czech Republic -- 35, Macedonia -- 18, Poland -- 60, the Russian Federation --60, Slovakia -- 25, Slovenia -- 12 (with the right to possibly enlarge its quota), Ukraine -- 40, Yugoslavia -- 35; non-Slavic countries: Australia and New Zeland -- 5, Austria -- 15, Belgium -- 10, Canada -- 10, Denmark -- 5, Estonia --3, Finland --15, France --15, Germany -- 60, Great Britain -- 15, Greece -- 5, Hungary -- 20, India -- 5, Israel -- 5, Italy -- 25, Japan -- 3, Kazakhstan -- 10, Latvia -- 3, Lithuania -- 3, Moldavia -- 3, the Netherlands -- 10, Norway -- 5, Romania -- 15, Spain --5, Sweden -- 10, Switzerland -- 5, the United States of America -- 50. This makes a total of 693 participants in the 13th International Congress of Slavicists. The International Congress of Slavicists will discuss any further requests for a higher quota at its future meetings. -- The Slovene Committee of Slavicists made a motion, and the motion was carried, that the thematic-block participants, who are members of the official delegations to the congress, not be included in the above national quotas but considered an indipendent extra quota of participants in the thematic blocks.

1.0 The congress themes: In 1999 the Slovene Organizing Committee for the 13th International Congress of Slavicists and the Slovene Committee of Slavicists prepared the first outline of the congress themes and submitted it to the reduced Presidium of the International Committee of Slavicists as it held its consultative meeting in Brno and Prague (September 1999). The second version of the preliminary list of the congress themes was drafted on the basis of proposals and amendments made by members of the Polish, Czech and German Committee of Slavicists (i.e., members of the reduced Presidium of the International Committee of Slavicists who attended the consultative meeting in Brno-Prague, 1999). This version was attached to the minutes of that meeting and dispatched to all the national committees of Slavicists, as well as published, in Russian and Slovene, in Slavia 69/1 (2000), pp. 128--136. The third draft of the congress themes, incorporating comments and amendments sent during the year 2000 by national committees of Slavicists, was discused at this year's meeting. The final and official version approved at this meeting is in the Croatian language and entitled Tematika 13. međunarodnoga slavističkog kongresa (Ljubljana, 15.-21. kolovoza 2003). Constituting an integral part of these minutes, it will be published together with the minutes in Slavia.

2.0 Forms of work at the 13th International Congress of Slavicists were discussed thoroughly and at great length as to their kind and quantity and particulary as to the structural elements relating to the concept of 'thematic blocks' from the point of view of content and organization. The following decisions were made:

2.1 The work at the 13th International Congress of Slavicists will be organized in four modes: (a) plenary papers; (b) sessions (work in 'sections'): panelists' papers, print-only contibutions ('scripta'); (c) thematic blocks; (d) round tables.

2.2 The motion to include special morning discussion groups for junior research fellows was not carried. However, the national committees of Slavicists are urgend to encourage young upcoming scholars' participation in the 13th International Congress of Slavicists as much as possible.

2.3 The deadline for submitting session papers: The deadline for submitting session papers (panelists' papers and print-only contributions) is October 1, 2001. They must be sent to the address of the Slovene Committee of Slavicists: (s.kongres@ff.uni- lj.si or alenka.dular@guest.arnes.si. In keeping with the tradition each submission should include a summary in one of the official languages of the congress (all Slavic languages, German,French, English).

2.4.0 In agreement with the decision made at the plenary session in Urbino (1994) the conceptual framework remains to be one in which narrowly specialized themes are treated in 'thematic blocks' as a specific mode of work distinguished from sessions ('section work'), i.e. panels tackling a broader range of themes.

2.4.1 The number of thematic blocks at the 13th International Congress of Slavicists shall be limited to a total of 20 (twenty).

2.4.2 The total number of active participants in the thematic blocks (cf. 2.4.7) constitutes a separate quota not included in the national quotas; the active participants in the thematic blocks are, however, official members of their countries' national delegations.

2.4.3 A new office was created: the office of Thematic Blocks Coordinator. To facilitate organization, it was agreed that the Thematic Blocks Coordinator would be appointed by the Slovene Committee of Slavicists and that he or she would be a member of the Slovene Organizing Committee for the 13th International Congress of Slavicists. The appointee is: Prof. Miran Hladnik, Slovenski slavistični komite, Filozofska fakulteta, Aškerčeva cesta 2, SI-1000 Ljubljana; miran.hladnik@guest.arnes.si

2.4.4 The national committees of Slavicists are to send their suggestions for thematic blocks directly to the Thematic Blocks Coordinator. He keeps a record of thematic blocks that have been suggested and must report on the progress at the meeting of the International Committee of Slavicists (2001), who will decide about each thematic block separately.

2.4.5 Whoever wants to propose a thematic block must submit their proposal to their national committee of Slavicists; if the committee endorses it, it forwards the proposal to the Thematic block Coordinator.

2.4.6 The person who proposed a thematic block becomes responsible for organizing the block and making sure that it gets carried out at the congress.

2.4.7 There are three to five sheduled discussants ('active participants') in a thematic block, experts in the field; three different countries -- three national committes of Slavicists -- need to be represented, and it is recommended that at least one of them be a Slavic country.

2.4.8 The discussants in the thematic blocks have ten minutes each to present their papers/theses, which must be published before the congress begins.

2.4.9 Any proposial submitted to the Thematic Blocks Coordonator by a national committee of Slavicistsvmust comprise the following elements: (a) the title of the thematic block, (b) the name of the person responsible for organizing the thematic block, (c) the names of the discussants, (d) a short argument in support of the content of the thematic block, (e) a short presentation of the issue or the theses to be discussed in the thematic block. Thematic blocks must be submitted to the Thematic Blocks Coordinator on a special application form (Thematic Block Submission Form), a sample of which is attached to these minutes.

2.4.10 Proposials for possibly organizing round tables will be made by the Presidium of the International Committee of Slavicists when it convenes in 2001. They will be selected from among the thematic blocks that will have been suggested by the time of the meeting.

2.4.11 The deadline for submitting thematic blocks: The deadline for submitting a thematic block to the Thematic Blocks Coordinator is October 1, 2001. The submission form should be filled out in one of the official languages of the congress (all Slavic languages, German, French, English).

2.5 The national committees of Slavicists are kindly requested to inform their memebers of the requirements concerning the thematic blocks. Those national committees that have already sent in proposals for thematic blocks are asked to resubmit them in the form now set.

3.0 New buisiness:

3.1 The following new members of the International Committee of Slavicists were unanimously approved at the meeting: Prof. Stefano Garzonio (replacing Prof. Giovanna Brogi Bercoff), Prof. Gerhard Neweklowsky (replacing Prof. Rudolf Neuhäuser), Prof. M. Pavlyshyn (replacing Prof. Paul Cubberly), Nicholas G. Zekulin (replacing Prof. Tom Priestly).

3.2 A nomination to replace resigning Secretary of the International Committee of Slavicists, Prof. Erika Kržišnik, was made by the Slovene Committee of Slavicists. Prof. Miha Javornik was approved in her place.

3.3 On the motion of the Polish Committee of Slavicists, Prof. Stanisław Gajda was appointed to coordinate the activities of the committees affiliated to the International Committee of Slavicists.

3.4 Prof. Janusz Siatkowski and G. Mihăilă were put up (by Professors Lucjan Suchanek and Dorin Gamulescu, respectively) to be selected honorary members of the International Committee of Slavicists. Both motions were carried.

3.5 There was a discussion on the issue of finance involving accomodations and foreseeable costs (such as hotel prices) per capita during the Ljubljana congress, as well as the issue of possibly obtaining additional means from international funds. The Slovene Committee of Slavicists committed itself to mailing preliminary information about this to all the national committees of Slavicists as soon as posible.

3.6 The next meeting of the Presidium of the International Committee of Slavicists was scheduled for the beginning of December 2001 in Slovakia, at the invitation of the Slovak Committee of Slavicists.


OUTLINE OF THEMES FOR THE 13TH INTERNATIONAL CONGRESS OF SLAVICISTS
(Ljubljana, 2003)

(Approved at the meeting of the Presidium of the International Commitee of Slavicists in Zagreb, 16--18 October 2000)

1.0 LINGUISTICS.

1.1 Linguogenetic, ethnogenetic and historical-philological aspects:

The genesis of the Slavonic languages in the context of Proto-Slavonic dialectology (with special reference to South Slavonic languages). Slavonic etymology between word-formation and semantics. Paleoslavic studies. Paleoslavic studies. Textology and publishing of early manuscripts.

1.2 Areal aspects:

Areal studies of the Slavonic languages (Baltica, Carpatica, Germanoslavica, Austroslavica, Hungaroslavica, Dacoslavica, Balkanica). The dialects of the Slavonic languages -- their origin, development and present state. Interdisciplinary approaches in dialectological research. The prospects, methods and techniques of linguistic geography.

1.3 Structural, typological and comparative aspects (at all levels):

Topical problems of scientific research into contemporary Slavonic languages (on all language levels). The dynamics and typology of developmental changes in the Slavonic languages. The typlogical image of the Slavonic clause on the metalinguistic comparative plane. Lexicological and phraseological neologisms in the Slavonic languages at the turn of the millenium. Developmental processes in the field of terminology and relations between the Slavonic languages. The structural typology of Slavonic names. Text linguistics.

1.4 Sociolinguistic and pragmatic aspects:

Language register. Languages in contact (Slavonic -Slavonic, Slavonic - non-Slavonic). The role of the national language in forming the national culture. Language planning and language policy in countries with a Slavonic language as official language. The position of the Slavonic languages in the world of contemporary communication and technology and the question of multilingualism. The sociolinguistic aspects and periodization of the Slavonic standard languages. The criteria of standard language in the Slavonic languages. Shifts in the South Slavonic standard languages in recent decades. The coexistence of the standard language and non-standard variants in the Slavonic languages. The Slavonic languages and processes of European integration and globalization.

1.5 Theoretical and methodological aspects in the study of the Slavonic languages:

The use of new technologies for Slavonic linguistic material. Text corpora in the Slavonic languages. The cognitive approach in linguistics.

2.0 LITERARY HISTORY. CULTURAL STUDIES. FOLKLORE STUDIES.

2.1 Special themes:

2.1.1 France Prešeren, Alexander Pushkin, Adam Mickiewicz in the Slavonic and European context.

2.1.2 The problems of literary creation in emigration.

2.2 Theoretical aspects:

Contemporary trends in literary studies in the Slavonic world. The functions of literature in the Slavonic world. General comparative literary studies and Slavonic literatures. Thematology at the meeting-point of literary studies, cultural studies and linguistics (theme, intertextuality, a model of the world).

2.3 Literary-historical aspects:

The typology of the origins of Slavonic literatures. The evolutionary typology of genres in Slavonic literatures. The continuity and discontinuity of literary processes from the Middle Ages to postmodernism (with special reference to the problem of literariness). Thematological and imagological relations between Slavonic literatures. The phantasy genre in Slavonic literatures. The literature of resistance. Regionalism and dialectal features in the literatures of the Slavonic nations. The Slavonic literatures of national minorities and of the diaspora. Slavonic literatures against the background or within the area of non-Slavonic literatures.

2.4 Cultural aspects:

Changes in literary life at the turn of the millenium (the influence of socio-political changes and new media). Gaining of national independence and the reinterpretation of the past (literature, language, culture and history). Globalization, cultural identity and multiculturalness - problems in the Slavonic world. The reception of Slavonic drama in non-Slavonic areas. Literature vs. philosophy and religious thought. Mass culture.

2.5 Folklore studies:

Folk texts in the context of culture. Text corpora of contemporary Slavonic folklore. The relation between the concept of tradition in literary history and folklore studies. The relation between oral and written literatures (with an emphasis on the changing of borders between them). Contemporary tendencies in literary history and folklore studies.

3.0 THE HISTORY OF SLAVONIC STUDIES

3.1 Special

theme: Josef Dobrovsky (1753-1829) in ther context of the European Enlightenment and social sciences. The role of Josef Dobrovský in forming Slavic national philologies. Josef Dobrovský's and J. Kopitar's view of Old Church Slavonic and the linguistic-cultural aspects of Slavonic manuscript literature in Carantania, Pannonia, the Balkans and Great Moravia, Pannonia Josef Dobrovský, Jerenej Kopitar and Slavonic folklore studies.

THEMATIC BLOCK SUBMISSION FORM
for the 13th International Congress of Slavicists, Ljubljana 2003

1. National Committee of Slavicists:

2. Title of Thematic Block:

3. Name of Person in Charge of Thematic Block:

4. Names of Discussants:

5. Brief Justification of Thematic Block Content:

6. Short Summary of Issue(s) To Be Debated within Thematic Block:

Date of Sumission:


Htmlized by Miran Hladnik, May 30, 2001.